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the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to the rules of the house and house resolution 821, i call up h.r. 6429, the stem jobs act of 2012, as amended, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6429, a bill to amend the immigration and nationality act to promote innovation, investment, and research in the united states to eliminate the diversity immigrant program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 821, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the rules committee print 112-34, modified by the amendment printed in house report 112-697, is adopted. the bill as amended is considered as read. the gentleman from california, mr. issa, and the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, each will control 45 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. issa: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks
@journal.org. talk a little bit about proposition 8 in california. as the impact what could happen this time around? guest: let me go back and say, marriage equality is no longer a partisan issue. if you look at socio-economic trends across this country, americans from all walks of life, all parts of this country, all sorts of americans, republicans, democrats, catholics, episcopalians, they all support marriage equality in majority's right now. that is probably one of the largest of allusions of has taken place since 2006 and 2008. you are right. perhaps the most high-profile marriage equality battle took place in 2008 in california around prop 8. unfortunately, we lost by just a few percentage points. as a result of that, prop. 8, a group called the american foundation for equal rights decided to launch a constitutional challenge for that vote. and it stands for is right now before the supreme court and on november 20, they will decide whether or not to take up that case. host: a paul talking about support for gay marriage. referenced that 50% of those who were polled, say it should be on the bal
in santa barbara, california. caller: hello. good morning. i guess my comment is, and kind of glad that the spectacle of elections are over. and maybe we can start to focus on some of the serious issues that still remain. i notice you just made a comment that reid had put out an olive branch to john boehner and mitch mcconnell. i am hoping that at some point in the future that may be c-span can run some segments on the article 5 convention. i really think that we needed to a convention of state delegates to deliberate over certain issues that none of the candidates talked about. i am very concerned about proprietary source codes and electronic voting machines. i am concerned about voter fraud, i am concerned about corporate control of what makes it out of a committee to the floor for a vote and what does not. my comment is, am glad the elections are over. i hope it can start to address some serious issues. host: that is john in santa barbara. usa today lead editorial -- voters can obama a subdued second term mandate. barack obama is election in 2008 made history purity become the f
. and even campaigning for incoming members who were in cakewalks in north carolina and cowart -- california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail.possibly in he to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be run around a corner -- right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still count
in chairman's role on the house side. ed royce from california wants job and so does chris smith from new jersey, who has a little more security -- a lot more security, but his advocacy for human rights -- fighting human rights is actually a negative among some of his colleagues, so to his record last time he got to chair a committee, the normally obscure veterans affairs committee, he went counter to republican orthodoxy and kept advocating for spending more and more money on veterans programs and basically kept him out. those are two others. >> i should point out that one committee that also will have the same chairman but will be inserting in the public's fear and possibly over health care is oversight and government reform, headed by darrell issa. he will be there for at least one more term. he has promised robust oversight of the obama administration. >> i am sure he has. speaking of oversight that is one of the few places on the senate side where they -- no, speaking of government -- homeland oversight? >> tom carper is set to take over that panel. joe lieberman is retiring and susa
was a young man. i worked in california for a movie actor who wanted to become governor. and i've seen nothing but the republican party in a degeneration mode. sarah palin. can you believe that? host: did you vote for ronald reagan in those years? caller: i voted for eisenhower. i voted for goldwater. the conscience of the conservative. now i see the degeneration of the republican party and it makes me sad because i believed in many of the principles. but the people that somehow they put forth by whatever forces there are controlling it, and i have no clue as to who is controlling it, it just dismays me and breaks my heart. host: let's hear from louis in oxon hill, md., on our independent line. caller: i'm going to vote for president obama. i believe in his vision. as a student, -- his prospects are so great for the country. every student should vote for him. in 2008, i voted for president obama and i am so pumped up again. i am so motivated. i am going to vote for president obama. i think mitt romney has nothing to offer the country. and i really feel president obama will win. he has my vote.
news today, california representative mary bono mack is conceding her seat. representative mack today conceded her race to democrat raul ruiz, who joins a large freshman contingent in the state's delegation. ruiz was leading mack by 4,679 votes as of thursday evening, with thousands of absentee and provisional ballots still to count. dr. ruiz will do a fine job if he is guided as well by the people of the congressional district as i was. please give him the opportunity to succeed, bono mack said in a statement. we want to thank all the folks who participated in this particular segment of the "washington journal." we want to let our viewers and listeners know that coming up, a discussion on the impact of the tea party in the 2012 election. and later in the program, author ira shapiro will join us to look at the prospects for compromise in the senate. this is the "washington journal." today is saturday, november 10. we'll be right back. >> here's a look at some books being publish this had week. jon meacham recounts president thomas jefferson's political prowess in "thomas jefferson: th
better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue states for the president. a couple of interesting house races. >> california weaken normally ignore. there really only been one or two states that have a chance of one-party taking over the other, but with this did it -- citizen legislative redistricting commission, the congressional map has been turned on its head. we're watching almost a dozen races in california. democrats need to almost weep all of the competitive races that we have in california in order to get even close to the 25. >> moving back east. first, maryland. roscoe bartlett. victim of a a democratic redistricting. because all it down into what recounted. he faces an john delaney, a businessman who was somewhat of a surprise winner over the state budgets and. -- state legislature. roscoe has an environmental street to him that does not make him a typical republican, but facing a very different marker county electorate. i think they will be tough to keep republicans in the majority. to go massachusetts, the congressman getting a lot of attention with all
: it is the sum of its house district + two for the senate. each state has two senators. california has 55 electoral votes. the district of columbia is awarded three electoral votes. host: jim from iowa, hello. caller: i have a question. in past years with george bush and al gore, that went back and forth. are they planning to make changes to extensive monitoring ? it is a back and forth thing. i have watched this election thing go for 17 months. i used to be a democrat and i'm so disgusted. i went republican. i have a lot of concerns and reservations because i have seen a lot of things change in how things operate and how politicians operates and i am concerned. i got early to vote. host: thank you. guest: the electoral college has not rallied the masses. it is an issue that deals with political process. we have the 2000 election that george w. bush lost the popular vote. that election -- the issue discussion dominated by what happened in florida. there was not a lot of talk about scrapping the electoral college. there has not been a big movement to overhaul the electoral college. it is k
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
, they would need to do better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue state for the president, but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> california, we can almost ignore the state come even though it is the largest state. there have only been one or two seats that had a chance of one party taking over the other. but the citizen legislator redistricting commission and the top two primary that has been turned on its head. democrats need to almost sweep all of the competitive races that we have in california in order to get even close to the 25. >> a couple of house races in which an incumbent is in danger, first in maryland. >> roscoe bartlett is a victim of democratic redistricting where he used to represent western maryland and now comes down to montgomery county and the washington, d.c. suburbs. he faces delaney, who is surprising. but the democratic nature -- the new democratic nature of the district will be tough for bartlett, even though ross perot has -- even though he has an element that the stomach of a typical republican. but he is facing a very differe
, a democratic candidate to beat jonathan paton. in california, the democrat there beats tony strickland. michigan's first. the republican, benishek, co mes out the victor. there are a few other outstanding ones. go to our web site c-span.org. as we told you yesterday, the state of florida had yet to be called. here is the "miami herald." we still do not know where the 29 electoral votes will go, but it has not made a difference in the overall outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic of what was your message to washington. a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal cliff. that is what faces these leaders as they make their way back to washington. here is the fiscal -- "the financial times." topping that list is paul ryan, the vice-president candidate returning to congress and has asked to continue on as chairman of the house budget committee. those are the people doing the negotiations. moving on to "the washington post." they know earlier wednesday barack obama call john boehner and others to urge them to put aside partisan interests to advance the interest
of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we all wearing rose colored glasses? i am sure some of his closest friends for making comments or had some kind of reservation about what was happening. the two of them together look very happy in conversation. i imagine that they had many, many other clandestine, you know, appearances together. the thing is, the thing that is hurtful is for the family. and, of course, the military and the government, there are a lot of answers. he will be held to a higher accounting. he has to bring it out. the pentagon will do that as well. the cia, the fbi, the president, all making sure that this is not swept un
at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern, part of a book tv's holiday >> actor and former california governor arnold schwarzenegger joins a group of executives for a discussion on hollywood impact on culture. this marked the launch of the university of southern california's new schwarzenegger institute. the discussion was moderated by ben smith. from los angeles, this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for turning up for this. it is an honor to be here. anyone who has been uncovering policy in new york kind of feels entertainment industry has this enormous power in politics and public policy, and also as a dark matter out there. we do not fully understand how it is affecting and changing what happens on the east coast. we have a remarkable panel of longtime leaders in that industry to help explain that to me and to you. one regret -- he apologizes for not being able to be here with us. he is working on the next "avatar" script. i will bring out the panel. the first person is arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] he is our host today. he is somebody who uniquely came from the
profound if you live in a glass house cast no stones. we've been joined by laura richardson from california. thank you for joining us here. this very unqualified woman of course spear headed efforts to bring the international sanctions against i ran, sanctions on -- iran, sanctions on north korea and has brought significant to bringing down kadafi. we now are going to hear from a very special colleague, terri sule from the seventh district of alabama. she has very special insight into the qualifications and integrity of susan rice. thank you for joining us. >> good morning. today i stand with my colleagues, proudly stand with my colleagues in expressing our outrage about the unfair attacks against the u.s. ambassador susan rice. these recent attacks are nothing short of offensive. nothing short of offensive. leading the charge to oppose ambassador rice are our senators who profess to want to block any potential nomination of this overly qualified public serve ant. and i for you cannot sit back like all of us and not say this is wrong. it's not only wrong, it's actually unpatriot i can. to b
and the california coast. but most will, i will remember the people i have met, their strength, their values, their generosity and hospitality to me and tv and our family. it is very important that we continue to fight for them and for families all across america. we have to fight for that young family in long island, new york. the one that wants to buy a home in the community they grew up in cannot afford it. we have to fight for that family in sioux city, iowa that can afford health insurance to pay the bills for its young son. we have to fight for those high school students in los angeles who are saying no to drugs and yes to their future. we have to open up that door of college opportunity to every young person in this country. [cheers and applause] we have to fight to end the shame of homelessness in this country. we have to fight for those unemployed steelworkers in pennsylvania and youngstown, ohio who want to be able to have a good job and a good wage to support themselves and their families. and we have to fight for those families and met with in california whose children today are
democratic circles, nancy pelosi has not given a hint about what is next. she has returned to california. sources close say not to expect any announcement before next week. democrats have a caucus meeting for wednesday." next is ron from taxes on the line for independent. caller: i am from kentucky. when these elected officials get elected to office, they sign a contract to the american people. they should not ever put their name on a contract to any certain group. they sign a pledge to work for all of the people, not just certain ones. i also think when the tea party got there thing go in, they do not want to come together in any kind of compromises. i just think it should be borne of a moderate thinking in congress to work towards the middle. i do not like the extremes either way. host: did the election change that attitude? do you think there will be compromise, and not the extremism on either end? caller: i hope so. from what i hear from mitch mcconnell, i do not like. i am a kentucky citizen. it is about time for him to retire. i think mr. john boehner wants to work out a deal. i re
? michele bachmann? jeb bush did not run. they got stuck with mitt romney. host: california has gone from a republican to a purple to a solid democratic state. what has changed? ronald reagan winning back in 1984. guest: i am proud to take a little bit of credit for that four at one time being the democratic party chair in california. the republican party is a mirror of the national republican party in the sense that i think they lost track of where the country was moving. republican registration in ronald reagan's day was 63.5% republican. today it is less than 30%. democrats did a good job of registering voters, but the republican party lost all of those people by their extreme right-wing philosophy and policies. host: pete wilson on the issue of immigration. why is that a mirror image? guest: we always had a hard time convincing latinos to vote, to register and to vote. we called them the sleeping giant. the sleeping giant woke up. he will send put an anti- immigration initiative on the ballot. the latino community came alive. a registered. now, they are a power in california and many
-- alex from california, a republican caller. caller: good morning. thank you for c-span. i have complete trust in the fbi, cia, at home and security. i have complete trust within the confines of their agency walls. if you look at all of the botched terrorist plots that have been occurring since 9/11, it is absolutely amazing what our agencies are doing to keep us safe. who i do not trust is the white house suits who apparently put a spin on the nsa's official briefs and input on worldwide events. i believe the white house puts a political spin on everything that comes to the president, to the secretary of state. then to the american people. it was 9/11 when we had benghazi going down. that is a data i think the president would rather have nothing going down. apparently there was something going down. with petraeus, is it not ironic that he is now being the scrutinized over these extramarital affairs when he is about to testify in regards to what happened in benghazi. >>let's get a couple more comments on facebook and twitter. thank you for all of your calls. coming up next, congressman r
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
. >> could you see sunday about california? we have had a big shake-up there. >> some are republican on republican and democrat on democrat, where they are spending huge sums of money. as the chairman, it is always a tough race. that is something -- it comes late and we want to make sure we do not get our clock cleaned. i would get nervous about california. >> i always pointed out to my friends that my own state does believe in a referendum or recall. we do not have term limits. >> the redistricting commission was ok. i have become much more sympathetic to a bipartisan redistricting. even if one of those gets over 50%, the top to have to run in the general election. it makes no sense to me and the california system -- >> i like the system because it forces basically candidate to talk to everybody and not just to a narrow slice of the electorate. it makes for better governance. >> it will serve as heads of your congressional campaign committees for your respective parties and you have alluded to the way things have changed since you were running these campaign committees. the influenc
of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winter in florida. -- the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we plan 4, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same% of the electorate as in 2008. we got if you got% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, boating rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battle ground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino v
stay with us. madeleine in thousand oaks, california, republican. caller: i am the wye fire the teacher. i feel i am an independent republican. -- i am the wife of a teacher. in california we feel we have too many administrators. the teachers need time to get further education and that should be demanded. there are teachers who should not be there. but there are parents who are very aggressive who come to school and have come on the playground and have hit the teachers. the teachers have insurance if something happens. one student came to school with her mother is underpants. it's not only the military that get tempted, but teachers get tempted also. host: we have a line set aside for educators this morning. we want to hear from them as well as we continue this discussion on how you would fix your school system. yesterday in washington recovered an event with florida governor jeb bush. he has an education foundation that heh startedthate held its fifth annual summit in washington, gathering policy experts, the likes of condoleezza rice and other folks were here talking about how we can
and california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail. possibly in hopes of being able to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still counting a lot of districts, but we have seen eight or nine competitive seats with a very interesting st
and gentleman, the senator from the state of california, the honorable dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, leader pelosi, mrs. bush, leader reed, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government, this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years, i have followed the tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988, she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying has been -- husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassina
up. thank you. [applause] k you very much,. . i appreciate what you are doing. in california, we have not adopted as much, doctors and twice as you have seen in washington d.c. when we introduce choice, the public schools, the bar will rise because they have to keep up with the charter schools. is that a belief you experienced in washington d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% to place? >> it makes a difference. i do not think you can have reform and education without choice. without choice, there will not be an incentive for the bureaucracy to change. it is easy for people to fall into the category of, if you want change, you push for change. i support public schools. i gave teachers the largest raise they ever got, gave the schools more money than they asked for, their test scores and results went down. more money, your kids come and the task force went down. that is because it is like a blob, bureaucracy, like a vacuum cleaner that sucks away the money from the local schools and pours it into the central office. you have all of these cost c
in the local proximity. we are now in a global marketplace. i was in california last week. we need to compete across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the nex
of mutual aid to bring in, more utility crews from surrounding areas as far south and west as california, those cruz becher drive in and get their relatively fast have driven in. but we still have crews on the west coast that have 3-5 days transit time. there is also concerned that with the fire season, if they could not get back for their fire season was that gets going, that they would not be able to send their resources. there is also aircraft. there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response. but also, understand that teams were already moving well before sandy hit. teams have been called from the midwest and south. if it makes sense that they can drive there faster than flying, then they are driving in. for those that need to, they're flying in this afternoon. >> i am wondering how the contacting process is going. some contracts are already in place. will there be proposals for other types of aid? does fema have enough money with the $3.6 billion? especially when they are only authorized for $3.8 billion. >> yes, we will
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
, we don't know what is going to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home in napa valley was broken into on monday. so, she actually has some little housekeeping to take care of. apparently people broken. they don't know what is missing. sort of this bizarre thing. in the event he does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the subtext -- almost a shakespearean subtext -- between steny hoyer and nancy pelosi, they have in turn together on capitol hill in the 1960's and they have been rivals for years. the last 10 or 12 years, competing for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is trying to live up somebody who she -- who would be her successor of choice. there is a lot of trauma and we just don't know where the dominoes will fall until we know her intentions. it >> just to wrap up -- who is in the next generation of would- be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement or if not
the republican party to a degree. i admit i'm a native california person and i didn't get it. how can we have this dialogue without screaming at each other. >> can we talk to each other and not scream at one another? >> i hope so. i think when you look at our politics and look at some of the dysfunction in washington and now we have the fiscal cliff issue that is facing congress and i think it's a real open question about whether we're going to have a politically induced recession. we're 40, 50 days away. you see a lot of turbulence in the markets over the next months but this is a political crisis that is going to be bring about an economic crisis if it doesn't get solved. but for the entire history of the country people do profoundly disagree with each other, have been and sometimes don't like each other very much have been able to sit across from each other and do the business of the american people. and that's what the moment requires now. on the question of screaming at each other we should understand that there are tremendous market incentives for people to go on tv and attack each othe
will be seen in retrospect as something close to the proposition in california. incredibly shortsighted with long-term consequences. whatever those republican governors and legislators thought they were doing, every latino population in the country and thought not only are you not competing for are revoked, you do not want our vote to. the gop is not even getting up to have argument about policies of this point. there is this time of tremendous identity of -- how often do you go to church? there is the identity politics. our system is frozen with the two out of three close presidential elections happening. >> right here. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking a
of the states that were scared, were not hard hit or some states as far away as california, they have pledged to get the equipment and cruise here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. one of the things we have been able to do, to give you a sense of how this is an all hands on deck approach, we are able to and c-130's, military transport planes, to move assets and personnel to speed up the process of getting power as soon as possible. our first party is water filtration plants and other critical infrastructure in the state. for that, we have to move some generators, and we have a ship that can help to move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with governor christie's office and local officials to identify what are those critical infrastructures, how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about. as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can get to work. there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and other places where transportation may be hobble
a phone call. california democrats line good evening. caller: i'm calling to say that i'm voting for obama because he has been through a whole lot for the first four years. he's trying to straighten out what the republicans has messed up. and i go with obama. host: host: thanks for call. gilbert is a long time reporter for the milwaukee tribbune. we checked in with him what he will be checking out on election night. guest: i think the turn out will be sky high. i'm going to be interested to see what the interplay is between those races or whether they're cooky cutter images because of how polarized these elections have become or whether we get an election that is much more like 2,000 and 2004 in wisconsin at the top of the ticket which was decided by less than half a percentage noint both cases or whether wisconsin is better for democrats than their national numbers which has happened on occasion. so wisconsin swings back and forth between those two patterns and those are things i'll be interested in watching on election night. host: our next call is from wisconsin on the republican line.
happy my sister is here from california ander fiancee. -- and her fiancee. [applause] my brother arthur and chad, thank you. [applause] wasgovernor's brother who in an ad with me, i thank him and his family. jeff knight and sharon and todd - i just love all of it. i love all -- all of you. i love you all. courtney the state chairman of the party andi also wanted thank my campaign. team. but the wonderful group of people. -- what a wonderful group of people. john matthews, darren scmidts, my field staff and my campaign chief, lisa booth, ryam bopothfield, mary stitz and everybody else the worked so hard and did so much. [applause] iran, ladies and gentleman -- i ran, ladies and gentleman, because i love this country and that love this state. -- and i love this state. the belief -- i believe so much the fact that we're so fortunate to be americans and to have the opportunity to have the liberty and freedom, the opportunity to do what ever we want to do. that is pretty impressive. the have an opportunity to choose our leaders. we did not always agree. but i congratulate the president tonig
in california. if you look at why it won, it was a crossover of hispanics and black pastors and joined the republicans. rather than look at hispanics and blacks from the standpoint of what we white people want to look at, why not ask them what they're -- they're interested in? wynola get their values and their cultural agenda and their priorities and address that? that is where there is great common ground and i do not understand why republicans seemingly are afraid of their own shadow and. when it comes to that. >> in the first national election, president obama embraced gay marriage. [inaudible] is this a losing issue going forward for conservatives? >> this is an issue that is free much under debate. you're right. there were four blue stage yesterday that approved gay marriage. most of them by very narrow margins. there were far less margins in the state legislatures in some of those states. would-be disaster is is if the obama administration had used the judiciary to oppose a solution on all 50 states that involved making doma unconstitutional and cutting off a debate when the othe
for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the uni
illinois and california and are largely redistricting gains. but republican still control the house. what would you say was the democrats' message this election cycle, in terms of the issues are policy? they talked about republican extremism but, what is the strong message that the congressional level? it was two-pronged. one, medicare, and two, the ryan budget. medicare is one of the examples , and the right and budget shows different priorities, and republican parties are wrong. that message did not really .orke it was not a decisive win, certainly at the house level, for that message. my editor mentioned this to me as i was going out the door last night. we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz won that one, one in new york when chris lee, he of sending photographs, left office in upstate new york, was replaced by democrat, and the third when the arizona seat opened up after congresswoman giffords stepped down after that horrible shooting, she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those specia
out is that there will be a certain amount of turnover. it is kind of like what happened in california. they just start running for other offices. you know that is one of the reasons the young mayor of los angeles. you know, it does inject a lost talent into positions you would not necessarily think of, but it does create problems because some of the people with seniority expect to be defered to. some of the committees that are not -- let me go through a couple of very important committees where we are not expecting turnover. paul ryan is not going anywhere. he will be the budget chairman again it sounds like. he will ask for a waiver. it is safe to say that will be granted. the appropriations and hal rogers from kentucky who is about as old bull as you can get. old prince of earmarks and reformed nonearmarkers now is staying put. fred upton the chairman of the energy and commerce committee where a lot of health care and energy policy go through. the committee of jurisdiction there will be staying for another two years. and ways and -- any type of entitlement stuff. dave camp. he is n
"getting a break." they listed some of the higher income states. california leads the way. if you go down the charge, the lowest states, indiana the lowest in terms of just what folks are getting in their homes in terms of added as -- itemized deductions. that's it from the other gentleman we heard in that clip. [video clip] >> tax increases to chase after higher spending is a fool's errand. we need to have that balanced approach we have all been talking about, which is increasing revenues through a process of tax reform, then spending reductions. we've had four straight years of trillion dollars plus deficit. you cannot continue this and have economic vitality, which is what we need. host: anything there you want to respond to? guest: the federal government spends over $1.40 for every dollar it takes in. you cannot continue to do that without having a day of reckoning. we need comprehensive tax reform. we need a comprehensive approach to regaining control of the budget, social insurance reforms, defense and other spending reductions, and tax reform that will generate more revenues. i don
to students from outside of the state from whom they receive no money from california or from china. they are private institutions. their actual costs are much less than most other private institutions. you have to understand, and i think we tried to explain that we are really only truly publicly financed for our in net-state students and that is where our priorities are. from out of state will provide you with the opportunity to attend, but we are a private institution to you folks. we will try to do our best. >> we need to think about where the u.s. didn't -- where the u.s. student -- we never had a conservative actor -- a concerted effort of a ranking system. the report does. it is almost entirely prestige and important. in its judgments as opposed to outcomes. we need to think more about how to deal with this problem. the public university has the system of accountability. but that is not everybody, of course. it's caught some way so we're trying to adjust its. but how to half in place incentives systems to focus on outputs is a big deal. during the brief period of time, i joine
not hard hit, or some as far away as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment, crews, et cetera, into new jersey. we were able to get c-17's, c- 130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel, to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure. for that, we have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people ge
and no state income tax and look at california as a case study they've lost 350,000 people to texas alone in the last 10 years. texas is growing, california is a disaster. a case study in disaster. >> congressman ryan, a hance to jump in. >> i think it's difficult to make a comparison between the oil bust, which is a commodity based product which can get caught up in different complications, versus the auto industry. i think it's a difficult comparison. but the auto restructuring package has worked and it's benefiting hubbard, ohio, and other areas where many people who work at general motors benefit from that. so it as the position on chinese steel that the president has taken that has benefited youngstown and gerard and many other people who work in that area. i take issue with him saying there's a lack of federal resources in texas. nasa has made huge investments in texas. many businesses in texas benefit from investments in the united states military. throughout the entire state of texas, i think if you look at many of the universitys in texas, they get a bode load of money from the r
initiative in california referendum indicates that the walls are coming down and some things from before. remember from the 1984 convention. he talked about raising taxes. that is no longer a taboo issue. i think you'll find some political liberal stuff and social liberal. >> the racial division on this is enormous. and exit polls, 60% of voters said they wanted to repeal the health care bill. large portions of african- americans and hispanics want to maintain it. a big challenge for democrats is that it is time to help unify power and government whether it was under johnson, carter, clinton, obama, they have seen their support among whites and plunge it said the delay. the challenge of convincing a much of white americans to benefit them is still on the table. the number you need to convince -- >> one of the problems the democratic party has had is that it has not been willing to defend government. it has always been specific. maybe obama learned something from his first term in terms of putting things into perspective. -- his victory speech had some of those elements. >> we will turn t
to try to put more women in congress across the country. i am proud that in california our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators. women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our members are great here, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator elapsed tammy baldwin [applause] senator idiolect maisie toronto. hirono. only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. that is very exciting. unfortunately we do not have kathy hochul this next congress, but the future is soon coming upon -- we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. we are still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success -- as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states? the house democratic women? because this is where the hopes and dreams of american families are. they may not know that, they may not know one party from the next and the rest, but we now that without roza deluaro we w
8 in california. 53% voted for proposition 8 in california. we're extremely conservative. and we also have to understand there's a big difference between old latino community of, say, 20, 30 years ago, what i call cesar chavez latino community, you know, new york, puerto ricans in new york and chicago and those in the southwest, who have been in the u.s. since the u.s. basically took half of mexico and new latino population, foreign born, 40% foreign born and the rest are the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary. but sometimes we get caught up with polls. we certainly have seen it in this election title -- cycle. and i think with latinos, besides polling them with specific issues, if we had a better understanding of where they're coming from, will you get an understanding of why they're answering the question that way. but i believe with the latino community we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have had a better position on immigration from the git-go, from the primary
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